DSL

What is DSL?

Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) is a family of technologies that provides digital data transmission over the wires of a local telephone network. DSL originally stood for digital subscriber loop. In telecommunications marketing, the term Digital Subscriber Line is widely understood to mean Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL), the most commonly installed technical variety of DSL. DSL service is delivered simultaneously with regular telephone on the same telephone line. This is possible because DSL uses a higher frequency. These frequency bands are subsequently separated by filtering.

The data throughput of consumer DSL services typically ranges from 256 Kb/s to 20 Mbit/s in the direction to the customer (downstream), depending on DSL technology, line conditions, and service-level implementation. In ADSL, the data throughput in the upstream direction, (i.e. in the direction to the service provider) is lower, hence the designation of asymmetric service. In Symmetric Digital Subscriber Line (SDSL) service, the downstream and upstream data rates are equal.

Why DSL?

DSL provides you with "always on" access to the Internet at speeds that let you work and enjoy the content rich environment of the web with none of the wait times associated with dial-up internet service.

What Is Required For Installation?

Your home or business must be within 28,000 feet (approximately 5 miles) of a telephone Central Office to qualify for DSL service. If you qualify, we can take care of the entire installation process for you.

What is ADSL2+?

ADSL2+ extends the capability of basic ADSL by doubling the number of downstream bits. The data rates can be as high as 24 Mbit/s downstream and up to 1.4 Mbit/s upstream depending on the distance from the phone companies Central Office to the customer's premises.

ADSL2+ is capable of doubling the frequency band of typical ADSL connections from 1.1 MHz to 2.2 MHz. This doubles the downstream data rates of the previous ADSL2 standard (which was up to 12 Mbit/s), but like the previous standards will degrade bitrate after a certain distance.

Also ADSL2+ allows port bonding. This is where multiple ports are physically provisioned to the end user and the total bandwidth is equal to the sum of all provisioned ports. So if 2 lines capable of 24 Mbit/s were bonded the end result would be a connection capable of 48 Mbit/s download and twice the original upload speed. Not all DSLAM vendors have implemented this functionality. ADSL2+ port bonding is also known as G.998.x or G.Bond.

Not sure if you qualify for DSL service? Simply click here and we will find out for you.